Posts Tagged ‘Sigma’

Hands on with the Sigma DP1x

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Besides the optics they announced at PMA in Anaheim, Sigma introduced three new cameras, including a new large sensor, compact camera—the DP1x. The DP1x is a successor to the DP1 and shares features with the DP2 (which we reviewed in the magazine last year, and which also got an upgrade at PMA in the new DP2s). It utilizes the same large, 14MP Foveon CMOS image sensor that is found in Sigma’s D-SLRs, and which as you can see in the image below, is massive compared to the typical compact camera’s image sensor. “It is approximately seven to twelve times larger than the 1/1.8inch to 1/2.5inch image sensors used in ordinary compact digital cameras,” according to Sigma.

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The DP1x uses the “TRUE II” image processing engine found in the DP2 as well as a new AF algorithm that is supposed to provide super high speed auto focusing. The camera feels very sturdy in-hand and looks good too. The series has developed a cult following due to its stylish, professional look and D-SLR-like image quality, all in a compact body. There isn’t pricing available yet for the camera—or for the other two announced (DP2s and the SD15 D-SLR)—but a good indicator is that the DP1 currently goes for $819 (MSRP) and the DP2 for $870 (MSRP).

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Sigma’s “Not a Fisheye” Lens

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This weekend at PMA in Anaheim, Sigma announced a whopping new lineup of lenses, including the 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM—the first ultra wide zoom lens with a minimum focal length of 8mm, designed specifically for APS-C size image sensors. The first thing you think when you see this compact lens is, “Hey, look at that Fisheye lens,” but you’re absolutely wrong (as I was). In fact, the curved glass is actually the “hybrid aspherical lens” with two “glass mold elements [to] give excellent correction for distortion and astigmatism.” Sigma’s David Metz even joked that the unofficial name of this 8-16mm lens was the “Not a Fisheye Lens.”

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Also introduced by Sigma was the 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM, which is being marketed as the perfect upgrade to the standard 18-50mm F11 kit lens of so many entry-level D-SLRs. Besides these two mentioned, Sigma introduced three other lenses. There is no official pricing for the new optics, mainly because they are so new that they haven’t even gotten a chance to really shoot with them to see what price points they should be at, but they will be available at the upcoming WPPI show in Las Vegas for people to check out in person.

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Sigma Scholarship Contest

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A selection of submissions for the Sigma Corporation of American Scholarship Contest

Sigma is offering a generous scholarship to “one talented high school senior to advance his or her education and goals toward obtaining a career in a photo-related field.” So, all you young’uns should enter to win the $5,000 cash award being offered. According to Sigma, ” Students pursuing higher education in industries such as photography, photojournalism, graphic arts and design, visual arts and art history are eligible to apply.” Go to www.sigmaphoto.com/scholarship for the complete rules and to enter. The deadline is Monday, February 15, 2010. The public will be invited to vote for the winner starting on the 16th, so make sure to check out the applicants even if you’re not applying yourself—you can help make a dream come true for a budding photographer.

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Check out the New Issue of DP!

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The new issue of Digital Photographer features profiles on top photographers, including renowned night/low-light photographer, Jill Waterman, and fine art photographer, David Julian. The issue also features hands-on reviews of new D-SLRs, compact cameras and camcorders,  including: The Canon Rebel T1i, the Sony A330, the Olympus Stylus Tough-8000, the Sigma DP-2 and the Sony HDR-XR520V. Also, check out reviews of the latest optic swap system from Lensbaby and Nik’s Dfine 2.0 noise-reducing software. Brush up on your understanding of focal length with a Back to Basics article and learn about special effects in video production.

Of course, there are always the columns you love: Digital Insider, Exposure and Inside the Image, which features the work of a DP reader. Learn how your photograph could be featured in the next issue here. We look forward to your feedback on the new issue, and as always, you can catch us on Twitter for up to the minute photo world news and Facebook for photo community discussions.

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