Posts Tagged ‘Samsung’

Continuing the Discussion: The Future of Point-and-Shoot Cameras

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photo © Stefan Baudy (Flickr creative commons)

UPDATE: In order to get several perspectives on our discussion about the future of point-and-shoot cameras (see original post about the topic below),  I approached Ed Lee, Director of Consumer Imaging Services Group for InfoTrends to get his “insider’s” take on the issue. He had a lot of great insight, and some very explicit views about the digicam VS camera phone questions we raised, which would be interesting to both people in the camera manufacturing business and camera consumers. Here’s what Ed had to say:

“Point and shoots will continue to hold a strong position in the digital camera market. Camera phones will co-exist. While some people will decide to forego a digital camera and just use the one on their phone, others will be inspired by their camera phone photography to go out and buy a digital still camera. As for sophistication, digital still cameras will continue to offer better features than camera phones because they are dedicated devices and do not have to make compromises because of other product constraints. They also continue to work hard at staying one step ahead of camera phones, for instance, digital still cameras offer 14 MP resolution today and camera phones are just getting into the 5 MP range. Digital cameras have a good flash, which when used drains the battery, something that phones cannot afford to happen, if people want to still use the phone function and have a long idle time between charges. Decent 10 MP digital cameras can be purchased for well under $100 now, so in many instances, the up charge to buy a more fully-featured camera phone will far exceed what an entry-level digital camera will cost. So besides the integration feature, some will not see the benefit of paying the extra money. 5 years from now, it may not matter what device you use to capture the image. The key will be what can you do with the image after capture. That is where the real value begins.”

Now we want to hear what you have to say about this topic. Do you think Ed Lee’s predictions are correct? Do you see yourself continuing to use digital point-and-shoot cameras down the road even as your cell phone’s camera advances it’s technology? Comment below or join the discussion at the DP Facebook Page.

Original Post:

FutureOfP&S_6

As fans of both the art of photography and the complex tools that help us to capture images–namely cameras–we at Digital Photographer would like to pose a question:

What do you think the future holds for point-and-shoot cameras, when it’s possible that in, say, five years time the cameras built into cell phones will meet the level of shooting sophistication of most consumer level digicams? Will point-and-shoot digital cameras as we know them today become irrelevant or, perhaps, extinct?

So called “instant cameras” have been around on the consumer level since 1948, when the Polaroid Model 95 went on sale (ref. The Impossible Project); and beginning in 1963, the Kodak Instamatic began to make photography accessible to the masses.

iphone3gs

As it stands today, there are over 130 new compact digital cameras on the market, offered by Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, Pentax, Samsung, Fujifilm and Kodak, and each of these manufacturers seems to be in a never-ending race to crank out more. Meanwhile, most anyone who owns an Apple iPhone (like myself) would agree that the image quality of the camera feature in the phone is inferior to even the lowest level point-and-shoot digital camera on the market. Sure, the 3MP camera boasts a built-in auto focus (iPhone 3GS) and a tap-induced digital zoom, but most digital cameras being produced by the above named companies come standard with, at the very least, an 8MP image sensor and 3x optical zoom. Oh, and there’s also always a little helpful feature called flash, which the iPhone still lacks. But the iPhone does record video as well as stills–something that a large number of the current point-and-shoot cameras on the market cannot also claim.

Join the discussion by posting a comment with your thoughts here, or at the DP page on Facebook.

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The Future of Point-and-Shoot Cameras

FutureOfP&S_6

As fans of both the art of photography and the complex tools that help us to capture images–namely cameras–we at Digital Photographer would like to pose a question:

What do you think the future holds for point-and-shoot cameras, when it’s possible that in, say, five years time the cameras built into cell phones will meet the level of shooting sophistication of most consumer level digicams? Will point-and-shoot digital cameras as we know them today become irrelevant or, perhaps, extinct?

So called “instant cameras” have been around on the consumer level since 1948, when the Polaroid Model 95 went on sale (ref. The Impossible Project); and beginning in 1963, the Kodak Instamatic began to make photography accessible to the masses.

iphone3gs

As it stands today, there are over 130 new compact digital cameras on the market, offered by Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, Pentax, Samsung, Fujifilm and Kodak, and each of these manufacturers seems to be in a never-ending race to crank out more. Meanwhile, most anyone who owns an Apple iPhone (like myself) would agree that the image quality of the camera feature in the phone is inferior to even the lowest level point-and-shoot digital camera on the market. Sure, the 3MP camera boasts a built-in auto focus (iPhone 3GS) and a tap-induced digital zoom, but most digital cameras being produced by the above named companies come standard with, at the very least, an 8MP image sensor and 3x optical zoom. Oh, and there’s also always a little helpful feature called flash, which the iPhone still lacks. But the iPhone does record video as well as stills–something that a large number of the current point-and-shoot cameras on the market cannot also claim.

Join the discussion by posting a comment with your thoughts here, or at the DP page on Facebook.

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Samsung Announces Two New Cameras

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Samsung has announced two new additions to their SL line of compact digital cameras–the SL720 and SL50. Both cameras boast 12.2MP and 5x optical zoom. The SL720 has a 28mm wide‑angle lens and Dual Image Stabilization, and the SL502 offers a standard 35mm lens and Digital Image Stabilization. More on both cameras after the jump…

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Samsung Announces NX Series Hybrid Camera (Kind of)

Hand-crafted mock-ups of Samsung‘s big PMA announcement– the inaugural NX Series “Hybrid” digital camera– sat on display behind thick glass today at their booth, as we were told vague details about this product that won’t be available until the second half of 2009. The NX (and the entire series to follow) are considered “hybrid” because they utilize technology specific to both D-SLRs and point-and-shoot cameras. On the D-SLR side, the NX will employ an APS C sized image sensor, though it will not feature a mirror box, like D-SLRs. This is the first big step in Samsung’s focus being heavily tilted towards what they’re calling the “hybrid digital camera market”.

Also mentioned was their new TL320 compact camera, which Samsung thinks will probably be their best selling camera this year. It looks neat with retro themed dials, and also comes packed with features, like 12MP, a 24mm Wide Angle Schneider lens, 5x optical zoom, a 3-inch OLED screen, 720p HD video at 30fps and optical image stabilization– all for $379.

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CES Day Two

Day two at CES brought news of even more exciting products, including new equipment from Olympus, Samsung, Canon, IPEVO and Pentax. Olympus showed us their entire lineup of nine cameras that were just announced here at CES, which will be available for consumers in March. The highlight was the Stylus Tough-8000, which is waterproof up to 33 feet (up to 133 with the separately purchased housing), can withstand being dropped from up to 6.6 feet, will survive being crushed with up to 220 pounds of pressure and is freeze-proof up to 14 degrees. Basically this thing can withstand any Hawaiian diving trip, Aspen snowboarding run, Moab off-road biking excursion, or night out at a bar here in Vegas (which can be just as dangerous as most extreme sports). Another cool feature of the Tough-8000 is the “Tap Control”, which means that if you’re skiing with bulky gloves, you can bypass fumbling awkwardly to try to press the buttons on the camera face and just “tap” the camera on different sides, to mirror the controls from the buttons, getting you to macro mode, playback, etc.

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