Posts Tagged ‘photographers’

Finally: Attributed Sharing from Flickr to Pinterest

Flickr has just announced a new feature that will hopefully ensure that from now on Flickr photographers receive proper credit in the wild west of photo sharing that is Pinterest. Pinners will now find a “Share this via Pinterest” button on all public and safe Flickr photos, which will in turn pin the shot to the site with proper, uneditable attribution attached.

Here’s a snapshot of the good news from Flickr:

“We made sure that every image shared from Flickr will be clearly attributed with the name of the photographer, the title, as well as a link to the photo page. Because the attribution cannot be edited, photographers can rest assured that pins and repins of their images will be credited and linked back as well, ensuring people can leave comments, fave the photo, or contact you directly on Flickr.

And to top it all off, if someone has embedded your Flickr photo on their website or blog and it is pinned from there, the photo will automagically be attributed on Pinterest and linked back to the Flickr photo page. Pinterest also went back and added the proper attribution to all photos that have been pinned from Flickr so far. With this new feature, having your photos on Flickr gives you much more certainty that you will be attributed when your photos are being shared on Pinterest.”

Also, of course, Flickr photographers have the option to disable sharing. Check out the full announcement on the Flickr blog for the whole deal.

(Flickr)

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Digital Reluctance: Can You Acknowledge Kodak’s Failure to Adapt While Still Harboring Your Own Digital Reluctance?


End of the Roll by Creativity103 – Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

The NPR/Public Radio International program “To the Point” today invited photographer Eamonn McCabe on air to reflect on the news that Kodak just filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. I listened to the segment in my car, on the way back to the office from lunch, and as I did so I was struck by the irony that by the end of the show McCabe—who is the former Picture Editor at the Guardian newspaper and an award-winning photographer himself—ended up holding fast and proud to the idea that digital photography is inferior to film photography and that it is a dubious format both in process and after an image is captured. This, in the wake of the news that the company that once dominated the world of photography—Kodak—was brought to its knees after its own reluctance to embrace digital technology.

At the top of the segment, McCabe says that he is “just staggered that [Kodak] just couldn’t see this digital revolution coming and couldn’t invest in it,” and that “to be so arrogant and conservative not to change, I just find staggering.” Later on in the conversation, when host Warren Olney urges McCabe to discuss the “quality of the product” in terms of digital versus film, McCabe talks enthusiastically about his Kodachrome days and admits his concern that nobody knows how long digital output will last. “We assume it’s going to last forever,” he says, “but does anyone know?” These days, McCabe is a half film, half digital photographer, though he says, “The trouble with digital is that it’s very hard to fall in love with a digital camera.”

Here’s where things take a turn: “I have a theory,” McCabe says, “Everybody’s taking loads of pictures now on their iPhone…and their digital cameras, but who’s looking at the stuff that’s taken?…You’re taking these pictures, and you might show them to somebody in a bar or somebody at work, but you don’t ever print it.” He calls this “the great mistake of digital.”

He goes on to wax nostalgic about the family photo albums of his childhood—which is all fine and good—but he seems erroneously out of touch with the ways in which photography is viewed these days. It’s as if he hasn’t considered the fact that digital images are seen by millions of eyes every day around the world via the largest family photo album imaginable: the Internet. With these comments, McCabe seems to believe that all digital images taken by the average person are forgotten the moment after the scene is captured and then quickly relegated to the deep dark confines of a hard drive. Has this man never heard of Flickr, for instance? Nevermind Instagram or Facebook—which now has an image collection ten thousand times larger than the Library of Congress.

While McCabe is certainly entitled to his opinion that film cameras are preferable to digital (because right now that’s not even the issue), what ultimately struck me as ironic after listening to his remarks was how he ended his talk by decrying digital photography in a strikingly similar manner to that same “arrogant and conservative” reluctance to change that he first labeled as Kodak’s big failure. This made me wonder: can you really acknowledge and learn from Kodak’s mistakes while you still harbor your own digital reluctance?

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Food Photography: Advice & Inspiration from a Food-Shooting Pro


all images © Nicole Franzen

 

Thanks to photo apps like Instagram, and to our current culture of capture-and-overshare enthusiasm, I can no longer sit down to a meal without snapping a photo of the food. If you take a look at the various tags on Instagram related to the things that people consume throughout the day (#food #eats #noms) you’ll see that I am not alone in the habitual photographing of my meals.

But outside of the realm of iPhonography, there is also a thriving professional food photography world. Yes, this is an actual job that many fortunate (and talented!) folks have managed to carve out for themselves. While some great cooking glossies have gone by the wayside (RIP Gourmet), there is no shortage of outlets for professional photographers to showcase (and cash in on) their work online and in print.

Culinary Composition

Professional food photographers may make their deliciously-staged shots look simple, but the craft of capturing food is no easy feat. Even someone well versed in the other genres of photography will have to relearn the rules when shooting subjects as fickle as couscous or cheeseburgers. And reflective subjects like glasses full of bubbly can offer significant challenges in improper lighting.

So with those sorts of challenges in mind, I’ve asked Brooklyn-based food photographer, Nicole Franzen, to share her tips for shooting food, including advice on equipment, lighting, styling and composition. Nicole runs the gorgeous food and lifestyle blog, La Buena Vida, and her photo clients include Bon Appétit, Edible Manhattan and Edible Brooklyn Magazines, and Gramercy Tavern, among many others.

Below are Nicole’s tips on the craft of photographing food. Grab a fork and dig in!

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Hey Hot Shot International Photo Competition

Apologies for the last minute notice here, shutterbugs, but you still have five days to enter the Hey Hot Shot International Photo Competition, hosted by Jen Bekman (of Jen Bekman Gallery and 20×200.com). As an emerging photographer, winning this photo competition would be akin to a small child smashing open a loaded piñata. Check it out:

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LA Times Asks, “Where’s today’s Dorothea Lange?”


Dorothea Lange, “Human Erosion in California” and “General Strike/Street Meeting, San Francisco”
(via J. Paul Getty Museum)

In a Los Angeles Times Op-Ed published this past Sunday, Jaime O’Neill discusses the lack of iconography present to represent the current economic crisis. “The pain and suffering has only been superficially covered by the news media,” says O’Neill, “but it has surely not been addressed by our artists.” O’Neill reminds us that during the Great Depression, artists from all fields captured the pain and struggle of the nation within their various works: Steinbeck with his words, Guthrie with his tunes, and photographer Dorothea Lange with her series of painfully striking images. Future generations also sought to, as O’Neill says, “vivify” the experiences of Americans in hard times, including Bob Dylan singing “The Times They Are A-Changin’ ” to Vietnam War protestors. And yet, the writer points out, there have been no bold works along these lines by the artists of our time. Even Dylan, O’Neill points out, now keeps his opinions to himself. And actually, it’s been the comedians who have been most outspoken about the issues. At the end of the piece, O’Neill says something that really resonates with me:

“As much as anything, the arts define the times, sketching a portrait of a moment in the life of the nation and the world, marking a period in ways it comes to be viewed by people who live through it and by people who come after. But the tale of our times is mostly being told by our unwillingness to tell it.”

What do you guys think about this, particularly as it relates to the photographers of our time? Certainly we are offered powerful glimpses at war and famine abroad by brave photojournalists every day. But what about photos documenting or commenting on the American experience?

Read Jaime O’Neill’s full article here.

(via LATimes)

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