Posts Tagged ‘Olympus’

Check out the New Issue of DP!

DPFall09Cover

The new issue of Digital Photographer features profiles on top photographers, including renowned night/low-light photographer, Jill Waterman, and fine art photographer, David Julian. The issue also features hands-on reviews of new D-SLRs, compact cameras and camcorders,  including: The Canon Rebel T1i, the Sony A330, the Olympus Stylus Tough-8000, the Sigma DP-2 and the Sony HDR-XR520V. Also, check out reviews of the latest optic swap system from Lensbaby and Nik’s Dfine 2.0 noise-reducing software. Brush up on your understanding of focal length with a Back to Basics article and learn about special effects in video production.

Of course, there are always the columns you love: Digital Insider, Exposure and Inside the Image, which features the work of a DP reader. Learn how your photograph could be featured in the next issue here. We look forward to your feedback on the new issue, and as always, you can catch us on Twitter for up to the minute photo world news and Facebook for photo community discussions.

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Continuing the Discussion: The Future of Point-and-Shoot Cameras

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photo © Stefan Baudy (Flickr creative commons)

UPDATE: In order to get several perspectives on our discussion about the future of point-and-shoot cameras (see original post about the topic below),  I approached Ed Lee, Director of Consumer Imaging Services Group for InfoTrends to get his “insider’s” take on the issue. He had a lot of great insight, and some very explicit views about the digicam VS camera phone questions we raised, which would be interesting to both people in the camera manufacturing business and camera consumers. Here’s what Ed had to say:

“Point and shoots will continue to hold a strong position in the digital camera market. Camera phones will co-exist. While some people will decide to forego a digital camera and just use the one on their phone, others will be inspired by their camera phone photography to go out and buy a digital still camera. As for sophistication, digital still cameras will continue to offer better features than camera phones because they are dedicated devices and do not have to make compromises because of other product constraints. They also continue to work hard at staying one step ahead of camera phones, for instance, digital still cameras offer 14 MP resolution today and camera phones are just getting into the 5 MP range. Digital cameras have a good flash, which when used drains the battery, something that phones cannot afford to happen, if people want to still use the phone function and have a long idle time between charges. Decent 10 MP digital cameras can be purchased for well under $100 now, so in many instances, the up charge to buy a more fully-featured camera phone will far exceed what an entry-level digital camera will cost. So besides the integration feature, some will not see the benefit of paying the extra money. 5 years from now, it may not matter what device you use to capture the image. The key will be what can you do with the image after capture. That is where the real value begins.”

Now we want to hear what you have to say about this topic. Do you think Ed Lee’s predictions are correct? Do you see yourself continuing to use digital point-and-shoot cameras down the road even as your cell phone’s camera advances it’s technology? Comment below or join the discussion at the DP Facebook Page.

Original Post:

FutureOfP&S_6

As fans of both the art of photography and the complex tools that help us to capture images–namely cameras–we at Digital Photographer would like to pose a question:

What do you think the future holds for point-and-shoot cameras, when it’s possible that in, say, five years time the cameras built into cell phones will meet the level of shooting sophistication of most consumer level digicams? Will point-and-shoot digital cameras as we know them today become irrelevant or, perhaps, extinct?

So called “instant cameras” have been around on the consumer level since 1948, when the Polaroid Model 95 went on sale (ref. The Impossible Project); and beginning in 1963, the Kodak Instamatic began to make photography accessible to the masses.

iphone3gs

As it stands today, there are over 130 new compact digital cameras on the market, offered by Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, Pentax, Samsung, Fujifilm and Kodak, and each of these manufacturers seems to be in a never-ending race to crank out more. Meanwhile, most anyone who owns an Apple iPhone (like myself) would agree that the image quality of the camera feature in the phone is inferior to even the lowest level point-and-shoot digital camera on the market. Sure, the 3MP camera boasts a built-in auto focus (iPhone 3GS) and a tap-induced digital zoom, but most digital cameras being produced by the above named companies come standard with, at the very least, an 8MP image sensor and 3x optical zoom. Oh, and there’s also always a little helpful feature called flash, which the iPhone still lacks. But the iPhone does record video as well as stills–something that a large number of the current point-and-shoot cameras on the market cannot also claim.

Join the discussion by posting a comment with your thoughts here, or at the DP page on Facebook.

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The Future of Point-and-Shoot Cameras

FutureOfP&S_6

As fans of both the art of photography and the complex tools that help us to capture images–namely cameras–we at Digital Photographer would like to pose a question:

What do you think the future holds for point-and-shoot cameras, when it’s possible that in, say, five years time the cameras built into cell phones will meet the level of shooting sophistication of most consumer level digicams? Will point-and-shoot digital cameras as we know them today become irrelevant or, perhaps, extinct?

So called “instant cameras” have been around on the consumer level since 1948, when the Polaroid Model 95 went on sale (ref. The Impossible Project); and beginning in 1963, the Kodak Instamatic began to make photography accessible to the masses.

iphone3gs

As it stands today, there are over 130 new compact digital cameras on the market, offered by Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus, Pentax, Samsung, Fujifilm and Kodak, and each of these manufacturers seems to be in a never-ending race to crank out more. Meanwhile, most anyone who owns an Apple iPhone (like myself) would agree that the image quality of the camera feature in the phone is inferior to even the lowest level point-and-shoot digital camera on the market. Sure, the 3MP camera boasts a built-in auto focus (iPhone 3GS) and a tap-induced digital zoom, but most digital cameras being produced by the above named companies come standard with, at the very least, an 8MP image sensor and 3x optical zoom. Oh, and there’s also always a little helpful feature called flash, which the iPhone still lacks. But the iPhone does record video as well as stills–something that a large number of the current point-and-shoot cameras on the market cannot also claim.

Join the discussion by posting a comment with your thoughts here, or at the DP page on Facebook.

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Tips for Capturing the Colors of Autumn from Olympus

©AllisonGibson_Maine

I recently returned from an 11-day, 1,500 mile driving tour of New England, which took me across six states (which is a big deal to a California native because here you can drive nearly 1,000 miles just going from one end of the state to the other) and I got to see a few burgeoning  signs of what is considered “Fall Foliage Season” in that region of the country (see my photo above).  It is an annual endeavor for many professional and amateur photographers from across the country to capture the colors of fall, so it’s great that Olympus is sharing some helpful tips for doing so at the peak of this beautiful season. My favorite tip is below. Click here to see the whole story by Olympus.

Use Exposure Creatively

On a clear sunny day, you can take pictures of the red and yellow autumn colors against the blue sky. On a cloudy day, try using exposure compensation to give the impression of a painting. Set the exposure compensation more towards the + (positive) side and the details of the cloudy sky will disappear and become white. When the sky turns white, the autumn colored leaves will appear in the picture as if painted on a white canvas.

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Olympus E-30

e30b

by Tony Gomez

Published Spring ’09

A New Creative And Fun 12MP D-SLR

Olympus’ E-series D-SLRs have a long history, continued with their flagship E-3 D-SLR, but with point-and-shoot digital cameras, there is relentless pressure to introduce ever more affordable D-SLR models, so Olympus has recently introduced the E-30. The E-30 can be thought of as a “scaled down E-3”, with many of the same features— but at a more affordable $1,100, body only price point. The most appropriate word I can use to describe the new E-30 is FUN. It’s got many professional features, inherited from its E-3 big brother, but there are also many cool creative features like Art Filters and Scene Modes.

Art Filters

One of the most interesting creative controls available in the new Olympus E-30 is the Art Filter setting. The Mode Control dial easily puts you into Art Filter/Scene Mode setting, and once you’re there a colorful menu screen offers you six Art Filter types: Pop Art, Soft Focus, Pale & Light Color, Light Tone, Grainy Film, and Pin Hole. Choosing any particular Art Filter is as simple as scanning down the menu list and selecting which Art Filter you wish to apply to an image. My personal favorites are Pop Art, Grainy Film, and Pin Hole because these three particular filter effects are the most dramatic. The creation of these Filter effects occurs within the camera right after you capture the image. There is no further need to download the original image into Photoshop, or some other image processing program, and laboriously alter it until you get the final effect.

With the Pop Art Filter, the image captured is boosted in contrast and made more vivid in color saturation. It’s almost like looking at a painting of what was captured. Grainy Film is akin to applying a high contrast, grainy black-and-white film effect to your captured image. Pin Hole adds an old-school antiquated look to your captured image by adding vignetted edges. This is characteristic of what typical pin-hole cameras of bygone days produced when photography was in its infancy.

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