Posts Tagged ‘Full HD’

Nikon Announces 36.3MP D800 DSLR


click thumbnails to enlarge

 

Nikon has announced the D800 “HD-SLR,” which features a 36.3-megapixel full-frame (FX) CMOS image sensor—meaning you can make enormous prints of your high resolution (7360×4912-pixel) captures. Like its (chronological at least) predecessor, 2008′s D700, the D800 has a more compact body size than a big gun like the D4, but its price and emphasis on super high resolution output seems to narrow its market to buyers like studio and wedding photographers who are most interested in print work rather than a broader class of photo enthusiasts looking to step up to a mid-range DSLR for travel and personal photo capture purposes. This is probably why Nikon is going to continue selling the D700 alongside its successor and at nearly the same price.

At $2,999.95, the D800 boasts the same 3.2-inch 921K dot LCD screen as the flagship D4 and its viewfinder offers 100% frame coverage (as compared to the D700′s 95%). For low-light capture, it has an ISO range of 100-6400, expandable to 50 (Lo-1)-25,600 (Hi-2), with the only upgrade to the D700 here being on the low end of the range (50 versus 100). The upgraded video capabilities are what have compelled Nikon to market the camera as an “HD-SLR”; the D800 shoots video at various resolutions and frame rates, including full HD 1080 at 30/24p and HD 720 at 60/30p. Additionally, as Nikon says, “For professional and broadcast applications that call for outboard digital recorders or external monitors, users can stream an uncompressed full HD signal directly out of the camera via the HDMI port (8 bit, 4:2:2).” Below is a test video shot by filmmaker Sandro with the D800.

 

 

The Nikon D800 will be available in late March for $2,999.95 (body only), and a supplementary model—D800E, which “treads in medium format territory for studio work or landscape photography” as it “enhances the resolution characteristics of the 36.3-megapixel CMOS sensor by cancelling the anti-aliasing properties of the OLPF inside the camera”—will be available in mid-April for $3,299.95.

(Nikon)

Share

Canon Announces 1D X Flagship DSLR Camera

Canon announced today the EOS-1D X—the company’s new flagship DSLR, which they’re calling “a high-speed multimedia juggernaut.” The model will replace both the 1Ds Mark III and the 1D Mark IV in the EOS lineup. So what makes the 1D X worthy of being called a juggernaut? Maybe the fact that the new “completely revolutionized” camera features three image processors, including Dual DIGIC 5+ processors, which Canon says are “capable of delivering approximately 17 times more processing speed than DIGIC 4,” though it also features a DIGIC 4 for metering and AF control. And speaking of AF, the 1D X includes a new 61-Point High Density Reticular AF, “the most sophisticated DSLR AF system Canon has ever released.” All AF functions can be accessed quickly via their own menu tabs, and you can create customized settings of tracking sensitivity with the new AF Configuration Tool. For those photographers who’d like input on AF settings, it comes with a built-in Feature Guide to recommend settings based on subject matter.

The 1D X features a brand new 18-megapixel full frame CMOS image sensor, which Canon says produces the lowest noise of any EOS digital camera so far. The sensor uses pixels that are “1.25 microns larger than those in the EOS-1D Mark IV sensor and .55 microns larger than those in the EOS 5D Mark II sensor”, in addition to gapless microlenses, to achieve high sensitivity for those clean captures. The camera’s ISO range is adjustable from ISO 100 to a whopping ISO 51,200 within standard range, and can be expanded to 102,400 and 204,800, which Canon says are “ideal for law enforcement, government or forensic field applications.” So, there’s that, if you’re in the habit of shooting in those conditions.

The 1D X is also Canon’s first EOS DSLR to feature Multiple Exposure capability, combining up to nine separate shots into a single image, in-camera—viewed in real time on the LCD monitor—speeding up your post-processing work, at least what’s usually required to remedy exposure problems. The 1D X records full HD video at 1080p, like its predecessors, but now notably features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB, allowing for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files. This was an upgrade requested by documentary filmmakers who’ve previously worked with Canon DSLRs. Another request from Canon shooters was to include dual card slots for instant image back-up and more storage capacity, and the 1D X delivered.

The Canon EOS-1D X is scheduled to be available in March 2012 and will be sold body-only at an estimated price of $6,800.00. See the full press release below.

click thumbnails to enlarge

Read the rest of this entry »

Share

Micro Four Thirds With Full HD Video: Panasonic Lumix GH2 Review

Panasonic Lumix GH2 Review
Text, Photos and Video by Jason Thompson

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2 is the updated version of its predecessor, the GH1. While still utilizing the same Micro Four Thirds system (see more about Micro Four Thirds here), this new generation camera boasts several upgrades.  Panasonic redesigned the image sensor, increasing the maximum resolution to 16.05-megapixels. The GH2 also has a slightly faster contrast based auto focus, as well as a touchscreen display. The one touch video button allows for instant switches to and from High Definition video recording mode. The combination of Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds system and Electronic View Finder allow the GH2 to maintain a very lightweight form. Even when combined with the 14-140mm f/4.0-5.8 kit lens (with silent drive focusing) that I tested it with, this mirrorless camera maintains an overall weight below many in its class. The GH2 lens mount is also compatible with the 3D Lumix G 12.5mm f/12 3D-capable lens.


Panasonic Lumix GH2: click thumbnails to enlarge

Read the rest of this entry »

Share

Sony NEX-VG10: High Definition Camcorder with Interchangeable Lenses

Sony NEX-VG10: High Definition Consumer Camcorder with Interchangeable Lenses
Text and Images by Tony Gomez

With the NEX-VG10, Sony has at last answered the call for a consumer-based High Definition camcorder with interchangeable lenses. My expanded review package included not only the kit 18-200 mm zoom, but also the following E-mount interchangeable lenses: 18-55 zoom ($300) and 16mm/f2.8 ($250). Also the following Alpha lenses were provided via the Alpha/E-mount adapter ($300): 16mm/f2.8 ($250), 30mm/f2.8 Macro ($200), 35mm/f1.8 ($200), 50mm/f1.8 ($150), and the Zeiss 85mm/f1.8 ($1,400).

Read the rest of this entry »

Share

Nikon Announces the 36X Superzoom COOLPIX P500

Nikon has just announced the 36x zoom COOLPIX P500, featuring the longest zoom ever integrated into a COOLPIX camera. The new super-zoom compact is an upgrade to the 26x COOLPIX P100, which we reviewed last year and called “an ideal travel camera.” This new generation obviously breaks the zoom barrier with its wide-angle (22.5mm-810mm) optical Zoom NIKKOR ED glass lens, but also boasts Nikon’s EXPEED C2 dual image processor for enhanced performance and noise reduction, as well as a new shooting mode button that “facilitates quick setting of continuous frame shooting, in addition to the pre shooting cache that starts to snap photos before the button is fully depressed.” I got to handle this camera behind the scenes at CES last month and was excited by the new features, such as full HD (1080p) video capability and the Easy Panorama mode. The P500 will be available for $399.95 in March. See the full press release for the COOLPIX P500, as well as two other superzoom camera announcements, below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Share
Page 1 of 3123