Posts Tagged ‘CES2011’

Hands-on with Sony HX7V and TX100V

Sony DSC-HX7V and DSC-TX100V

CES 2011, Las VegasSony‘s latest Cyber-shot announcements stood out this week at CES because they are the world’s first compact digital still cameras to include 3D Still Image mode using only one lens and imager, wherein the camera takes “two shots in different focus positions to calculate the depths, and then it creates left-eye and right-eye images to produce a 3D effect.” I was excited to check out two of these compact 16.2-megapixel CMOS sensor cameras in particular on the show floor—the HX7V and the TX100V. The HX7V follows last year’s HX5V, and carries over many of its features, including Sony’s “Exmor R” back-illuminated CMOS sensor technology, but it also has upgrades such as 3D image capture using 3D Sweep Panorama mode or the new 3D Still Image mode. I really like the way this slim camera feels in-hand because it has a little weight to it and a textured rubber grip on the front. It feels solid and expensive (and, well, you can make the call about the latter claim; it’s priced at $300 as of now). The TX100V is the first Cyber-shot to have a 3.5-inch OLED with touch screen, which Sony claims provides more vibrancy and a faster response time than an LCD. The touch screen was very responsive when I tested it out. It’s a gorgeous little camera that packs a lot of features—actual fun, useful features—into its sleek little body, and I’d love to spend even more time with it soon.

Sony DSC-HX7V (image 1) and Sony DSC-TX100V (images 2-4)
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Hands-on GE’s New Superzoom Camera & Waterproof Pocket Camcorder

CES 2011, Las Vegas—GE has long been a household name, though not necessarily when it comes to digital imaging. Over the past few years, however, they have been creeping into the digital camera market with their stylish and very competitively priced digicams. The new lineup from CES 2011 includes some cameras that should put the brand on the map when it comes to affordable, feature-packed compact cameras and camcorders. The ultra compact, 15x zoom GE PowerPro X500 is shaped like most other longzoom compacts, with an exaggerated grip and a lot of glass shining on the front, but the body is even smaller than most I’ve seen in the category. And the price? Well, that’s also much smaller at $149 (tentatively). The 16-megapixel X500 has an electronic view finder, in-camera HDR mode, optical image stabilization, supports ISOs up to 3200, shoots HD video (720p), and comes in black or a polished white color. The zoom was very smooth when I played with it and the view finder was a nice, more professional-feeling touch, though it was quite tiny and I had to squint pretty hard to look through it.

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The waterproof, shockproof, dustproof GE DV1 pocket camcorder was another nice surprise from the new lineup. At $129 (tentatively) it is also much more affordable than its competitors, and records full 1080p HD video. The DV1, though very compact and cutely styled, feels pretty solid in-hand due to its metal chassis, and it also features a 2.5-inch LCD and built-in USB. The DV1 has a 4x zoom and shoots 5MP still images, even when in video record mode. I can see this being a fun family pocket camcorder, which will withstand the kind of trauma a family who has fun with put it through.

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Hands-on with Olympus PEN E-PL2

CES 2011, Las Vegas—I can confirm now that the new Olympus PEN E-PL2 is, in fact, more ergonomically comfortable, the layout more functional. The on/off button is now recessed so that there’s no chance of clicking it rather than the shutter release. After all, that was one of the resolved issues that Olympus touted when they announced this new, fourth generation compact, interchangeable lens PEN camera on Wednesday. There aren’t so many other noticeable changes from the PEN E-PL1, though the 460,000 dot LCD is much brighter than that of its predecessor. The new camera was modeled on its predecessor—and underwent a few little tweaks based on user feedback—in order to emerge as this slightly altered, still feature-packed, powerful image maker in a small package. The Art Filters (still the most well done out of any I’ve seen from the several companies who now include similar modes in their equipment), the Live Guide feature, the Intelligent Auto mode, and the DSLR-sized image sensor were all carried over from the previous model. Think of it as a face lift, really—the subtle kind that makes a person look refreshed rather than scary.

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Hands-on with Samsung NX11

CES 2011, Las Vegas—The new Samsung NX11 mirrorless interchangeable lens camera is the latest in the company’s successful NX lineup, following the NX10, which we really enjoyed testing last summer. (For more information on the technology of interchangeable lens cameras, check out the NX10 link.) The upgrades to the new NX11 include the i-function lens, which allows for full manual shooting controls (aperture, shutter speed, EV, WB, and ISO) via the i-function button or ring on the lens—allowing the photographer to control these settings easily, without taking the camera off the subject. The NX11 continues to use the APS-C size image sensor (which is larger than that of the micro four thirds sensor) for advanced image quality in a compact body.

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Hands-on with Panasonic Lumix GF2

CES 2011, Las Vegas—The Panasonic Lumix GF2, announced late this fall, is the successor to the GF1 which we were quite impressed with when we reviewed it. The Micro Four Thirds system camera is as lightweight as a compact digicam and shoots with DSLR quality. This new GF2 can now handle ISOs up to 6400 and has a slightly smaller, lighter body than its predecessor. Panasonic has still forgone a viewfinder, which would make this lady happy, though it can be fitted with an optional EVF accessory.I look forward to more time with this sleek little guy.

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