Posts Tagged ‘Cameras’

Pentax Announces K-01 Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera

Pentax today announced the K-01 interchangeable lens camera. Right off the bat it’s worth noting that unlike other manufacturers’ forays into the compact ICL system market (and there are now several, many of whom are years ahead of Pentax in this genre), the Pentax K-01 is compatible with Pentax K-mount lenses, which means that your arsenal of K-mount lenses won’t be rendered useless if you get into the new system. This feels like a classic Pentax move to me; they’ve always seemed most interested in offering loyal shooters the best ways in which to capture the world, frame by frame. That being said, the camera does come in a kit option with the new Pentax DA 40mm F/2.8 XS “unofficial” interchangeable standard lens, which Pentax claims is now the world’s thinnest interchangeable lens.

The K-01 also looks quite different than other cameras in its genre. Having been designed by acclaimed London-based designer, Marc Newson, it features an eye-catching pop of yellow on its bubbly little body. (If the bold yellow is too much for you, the camera also comes in black or white.) Pentax is calling the camera more than a photographer’s tool; it’s also a design object. And while this particular aesthetic might not be my favorite, the design junkie in me can definitely appreciate the collaboration.

But what matters most is the guts of the camera, because it needs to take inspiring photos, not just look interesting hanging from your neck. The K-01 features a 16-megapixel APS-C sized CMOS image sensor, a 3-inch 920K dot LCD display, an ISO range of 100-25600, and shoots full 1080p HD video.

The K-01 will be available in March for $749.95 (body only) or $899.95 (with DA 40mm XS).

(PENTAX)

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Survey Reveals that Digital Camera Use is Down, Mobile Device Capture is Up

Photobucket today released the results of a survey taken over the 2011 holiday season that reveals a downward trend in digital camera capture. “Only 64% reported use of digital cameras for capturing the majority of their images throughout the season, down from 82 percent in the 2010 holiday survey,” Photobucket reports. The trend translates to video capture as well, with 80% reporting they shot video on a mobile device at least once and half of those people saying they used a mobile device to record video daily or multiple times per day during the survey period.

In other words, unsurprisingly, people are becoming more and more dependent on iPhones and the like, rather than dedicated photo gear, to capture daily life. Of course this wasn’t necessarily a survey of photography enthusiasts whose interests lie only in producing the best images, but rather, more likely, it reflects the habits of those concerned with capturing images most conveniently. Clearly, though, any of us could report from anecdotal evidence that among hobbyists and novices alike it is increasingly the custom to make use of both formats, depending on the shooting situation.

What about you? Do you find yourself using a camera phone most often for daily capture, or do you hold fast to the dedicated digital camera for all your shooting?

(Photobucket)

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9to5mac Reports that Steve Jobs was Looking into Lytro Camera Technology for iPhones

9to5mac is reporting that shortly before he passed away Steve Jobs met with Lytro CEO Ren Ng to discuss cameras, product design, and the ways in which he might apply Lytro’s groundbreaking light field technology into a new generation of iPhone cameras. According to “Inside Apple,” the forthcoming book by Adam Lashinsky, which 9to5mac excerpts in their report, “At Jobs’s request, [Ng] agreed to send him an email outlining three things he’d like Lytro to do with Apple.”

“Jobs actively pursued his goal of reinventing photography, asking the CEO of Lytro to outline three specific things that the company would want to work on with Apple,” reports 9to5mac.

If you’ve forgotten, Lytro is the tiny rectangle camera designed by Ng—a Stanford PhD—that captures “living pictures” that are focused after the fact by capturing an image’s entire light field data in one click. The “living picture” bit means that the image is forever adabtable. Now imagine if this technology were applied to the ubiquitous iPhone camera, which, as 9to5mac points out, is already “mobile photography at its finest.”

Give the circumstances now it’s uncertain whether the Lytro/Apple mashup will ever see the (excuse the pun) “light” of day, but it is a pretty exciting prospect to imagine.

(Gizmodo, via 9to5mac)

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Canon Announces PowerShot G1 X Camera

The latest offering in Canon‘s prosumer PowerShot G series is the new G1 X. Announced today—the first official day of CES—the G1 X features a 1.5-inch 14.3-megapixel CMOS sensor (compared to the G12‘s 1/1.7-inch 10MP CCD sensor) as well as Canon’s DIGIC 5 image processor. It also boasts an ISO range of up to 12800 for low-light capture and an f/2.8-f/16 4x optical zoom lens. With a price tag of $800, the G1 X costs as much, if not more, than an entry-level Canon DSLR, which might turn off those photographers who are shopping around for a next level camera to step up their image quality and feature set from a compact point-and-shoot, especially if they’re looking to get into a system with interchangeable lenses. However, the Canon G series has for more than a decade now been a favorite everywhere camera for professional and enthusiast shutterbugs when they need to reach for a more portable option that will still make great images.

The Canon G1 X will be available for $799.99 in February.

(Canon)

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Nikon Announces Flagship FX-Format D4 DSLR

Just ahead of CES, Nikon has unveiled its new big gun: the D4 DSLR. Featuring a 6.2-megapixel FX (full)-format CMOS sensor and an ISO range up to 204,800, the D4 is a professional grade low-light fighting machine. Notable upgrades to 2009′s D3S—in addition to the 7.3-micron pixels sensor and mega ISO range—include: a 3.2-inch 921K dot LCD screen; a time lapse shooting feature that combines a selected frame rate and shot interval in a dedicated time lapse photography menu with playback speeds from 24x to 36,000x; and full HD video recording (1080p at 30 or 24fps and 720p at 60 fps). Additionally, using B-Frame data compression allows you to record H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC format video for up to 20 minutes per clip.

 

The Nikon D4 will be available for $5999.95 in February and is compatible with all 50+ lenses in the NIKKOR optics system.

(via Nikon)

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