Posts Tagged ‘business’

Will Yahoo’s New CEO, Marissa Mayer, make Flickr awesome again?

Will Yahoo’s New CEO, Marissa Mayer, make Flickr awesome again? One fast-acting domain-purchaser certainly hopes so.

But seriously, we all know Flickr isn’t what it used to be. We at DP still love the site, which is brimming with the work of talented shutterbugs the world over (our Flickr Group pool is where we pull all of our daily closeUP shots from, and clearly there’s no shortage of amazing photography to be found there), but the user experience could be much, much improved. So with this week’s news that long-time Googler Marissa Mayer will be the new head of Yahoo (which owns Flickr), there is renewed hope that the once dominant photo-sharing site will get the attention it deserves. After all, Ms. Mayer not only has major tech chops, she is also expecting a baby this fall whom she will no doubt want to photograph the daylights out of like any other 21st Century parent.

(screenshot via dearmarissamayer.com)

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Finally: Attributed Sharing from Flickr to Pinterest

Flickr has just announced a new feature that will hopefully ensure that from now on Flickr photographers receive proper credit in the wild west of photo sharing that is Pinterest. Pinners will now find a “Share this via Pinterest” button on all public and safe Flickr photos, which will in turn pin the shot to the site with proper, uneditable attribution attached.

Here’s a snapshot of the good news from Flickr:

“We made sure that every image shared from Flickr will be clearly attributed with the name of the photographer, the title, as well as a link to the photo page. Because the attribution cannot be edited, photographers can rest assured that pins and repins of their images will be credited and linked back as well, ensuring people can leave comments, fave the photo, or contact you directly on Flickr.

And to top it all off, if someone has embedded your Flickr photo on their website or blog and it is pinned from there, the photo will automagically be attributed on Pinterest and linked back to the Flickr photo page. Pinterest also went back and added the proper attribution to all photos that have been pinned from Flickr so far. With this new feature, having your photos on Flickr gives you much more certainty that you will be attributed when your photos are being shared on Pinterest.”

Also, of course, Flickr photographers have the option to disable sharing. Check out the full announcement on the Flickr blog for the whole deal.

(Flickr)

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Kodak to Stop Making Cameras, Pocket Video Cams and Digital Frames

Kodak announced today that it plans to “phase out its dedicated capture devices business—comprising digital cameras, pocket video cameras and digital picture frames—in the first half of 2012.” This news comes less than one month after the company filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy, a move that Kodak said would result in a rigorous reorganization of the company. Not surprisingly, they appear to have determined that the crippled digital capture leg had to be severed.

Still, this is sad news. There’s no denying that for so long the Kodak brand was synonymous with cameras and picture making. Moving forward, their focus will be on: retail-based photo kiosks and digital dry lab systems, inkjet printers, online photo galleries, camera accessories and batteries—which they are quick to point out are compatible with cameras made by other manufacturers, and in a final bittersweet twist, the “traditional film capture and photographic paper business.”

(Kodak)

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9to5mac Reports that Steve Jobs was Looking into Lytro Camera Technology for iPhones

9to5mac is reporting that shortly before he passed away Steve Jobs met with Lytro CEO Ren Ng to discuss cameras, product design, and the ways in which he might apply Lytro’s groundbreaking light field technology into a new generation of iPhone cameras. According to “Inside Apple,” the forthcoming book by Adam Lashinsky, which 9to5mac excerpts in their report, “At Jobs’s request, [Ng] agreed to send him an email outlining three things he’d like Lytro to do with Apple.”

“Jobs actively pursued his goal of reinventing photography, asking the CEO of Lytro to outline three specific things that the company would want to work on with Apple,” reports 9to5mac.

If you’ve forgotten, Lytro is the tiny rectangle camera designed by Ng—a Stanford PhD—that captures “living pictures” that are focused after the fact by capturing an image’s entire light field data in one click. The “living picture” bit means that the image is forever adabtable. Now imagine if this technology were applied to the ubiquitous iPhone camera, which, as 9to5mac points out, is already “mobile photography at its finest.”

Give the circumstances now it’s uncertain whether the Lytro/Apple mashup will ever see the (excuse the pun) “light” of day, but it is a pretty exciting prospect to imagine.

(Gizmodo, via 9to5mac)

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Digital Reluctance: Can You Acknowledge Kodak’s Failure to Adapt While Still Harboring Your Own Digital Reluctance?


End of the Roll by Creativity103 – Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

The NPR/Public Radio International program “To the Point” today invited photographer Eamonn McCabe on air to reflect on the news that Kodak just filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy. I listened to the segment in my car, on the way back to the office from lunch, and as I did so I was struck by the irony that by the end of the show McCabe—who is the former Picture Editor at the Guardian newspaper and an award-winning photographer himself—ended up holding fast and proud to the idea that digital photography is inferior to film photography and that it is a dubious format both in process and after an image is captured. This, in the wake of the news that the company that once dominated the world of photography—Kodak—was brought to its knees after its own reluctance to embrace digital technology.

At the top of the segment, McCabe says that he is “just staggered that [Kodak] just couldn’t see this digital revolution coming and couldn’t invest in it,” and that “to be so arrogant and conservative not to change, I just find staggering.” Later on in the conversation, when host Warren Olney urges McCabe to discuss the “quality of the product” in terms of digital versus film, McCabe talks enthusiastically about his Kodachrome days and admits his concern that nobody knows how long digital output will last. “We assume it’s going to last forever,” he says, “but does anyone know?” These days, McCabe is a half film, half digital photographer, though he says, “The trouble with digital is that it’s very hard to fall in love with a digital camera.”

Here’s where things take a turn: “I have a theory,” McCabe says, “Everybody’s taking loads of pictures now on their iPhone…and their digital cameras, but who’s looking at the stuff that’s taken?…You’re taking these pictures, and you might show them to somebody in a bar or somebody at work, but you don’t ever print it.” He calls this “the great mistake of digital.”

He goes on to wax nostalgic about the family photo albums of his childhood—which is all fine and good—but he seems erroneously out of touch with the ways in which photography is viewed these days. It’s as if he hasn’t considered the fact that digital images are seen by millions of eyes every day around the world via the largest family photo album imaginable: the Internet. With these comments, McCabe seems to believe that all digital images taken by the average person are forgotten the moment after the scene is captured and then quickly relegated to the deep dark confines of a hard drive. Has this man never heard of Flickr, for instance? Nevermind Instagram or Facebook—which now has an image collection ten thousand times larger than the Library of Congress.

While McCabe is certainly entitled to his opinion that film cameras are preferable to digital (because right now that’s not even the issue), what ultimately struck me as ironic after listening to his remarks was how he ended his talk by decrying digital photography in a strikingly similar manner to that same “arrogant and conservative” reluctance to change that he first labeled as Kodak’s big failure. This made me wonder: can you really acknowledge and learn from Kodak’s mistakes while you still harbor your own digital reluctance?

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