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Nikon Announces 36.3MP D800 DSLR


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Nikon has announced the D800 “HD-SLR,” which features a 36.3-megapixel full-frame (FX) CMOS image sensor—meaning you can make enormous prints of your high resolution (7360×4912-pixel) captures. Like its (chronological at least) predecessor, 2008′s D700, the D800 has a more compact body size than a big gun like the D4, but its price and emphasis on super high resolution output seems to narrow its market to buyers like studio and wedding photographers who are most interested in print work rather than a broader class of photo enthusiasts looking to step up to a mid-range DSLR for travel and personal photo capture purposes. This is probably why Nikon is going to continue selling the D700 alongside its successor and at nearly the same price.

At $2,999.95, the D800 boasts the same 3.2-inch 921K dot LCD screen as the flagship D4 and its viewfinder offers 100% frame coverage (as compared to the D700′s 95%). For low-light capture, it has an ISO range of 100-6400, expandable to 50 (Lo-1)-25,600 (Hi-2), with the only upgrade to the D700 here being on the low end of the range (50 versus 100). The upgraded video capabilities are what have compelled Nikon to market the camera as an “HD-SLR”; the D800 shoots video at various resolutions and frame rates, including full HD 1080 at 30/24p and HD 720 at 60/30p. Additionally, as Nikon says, “For professional and broadcast applications that call for outboard digital recorders or external monitors, users can stream an uncompressed full HD signal directly out of the camera via the HDMI port (8 bit, 4:2:2).” Below is a test video shot by filmmaker Sandro with the D800.

 

 

The Nikon D800 will be available in late March for $2,999.95 (body only), and a supplementary model—D800E, which “treads in medium format territory for studio work or landscape photography” as it “enhances the resolution characteristics of the 36.3-megapixel CMOS sensor by cancelling the anti-aliasing properties of the OLPF inside the camera”—will be available in mid-April for $3,299.95.

(Nikon)

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Panasonic Announces 20x Zoom LUMIX DMC-ZS20 Camera with Built-In GPS

Panasonic has announced the the LUMIX DMC-ZS20, the “world’s slimmest” 20x digital camera. Featuring a 24mm wide angle LEICA DC VARIO-ELMAR lens, the 14.1-megapixel LUMiX ZS20 geotags captured shots with a built-in GPS functionality that features detailed map information (country, state, city, nearby landmarks). The camera also features burst shooting at 10fps and records full 1080p HD video.

The LUMIX DMC-ZS20 will be available in March for $349.99.

(Panasonic)

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Ricoh Announces Newly Developed Fifth Camera Unit in the GXR System

Ricoh today announced the RICOH LENS A16 24-85mm F3.5-5.5, which is a newly developed unit for the company’s unique GXR interchangeable unit camera system. First launched in 2009, Ricoh explains the system as such: “the GXR is a revolutionary interchangeable unit camera system in which lenses can be changed by mounting camera units that integrate lens, image sensor, and image processing engine into a single unit.”

The newly developed 24-85mm wide angle zoom lens with an APS-C size 16.2-megapixel CMOS sensor features nine rounded aperture blades so you can capture beautiful bokeh; an ISO bracketing function so you can shoot three simultaneous images with three different ISO sensitivities; and a feature that allows copyright information such as the photographer’s name to be entered and written to the image Exif data. More from Ricoh here.

(Ricoh)

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Pentax Announces K-01 Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera

Pentax today announced the K-01 interchangeable lens camera. Right off the bat it’s worth noting that unlike other manufacturers’ forays into the compact ICL system market (and there are now several, many of whom are years ahead of Pentax in this genre), the Pentax K-01 is compatible with Pentax K-mount lenses, which means that your arsenal of K-mount lenses won’t be rendered useless if you get into the new system. This feels like a classic Pentax move to me; they’ve always seemed most interested in offering loyal shooters the best ways in which to capture the world, frame by frame. That being said, the camera does come in a kit option with the new Pentax DA 40mm F/2.8 XS “unofficial” interchangeable standard lens, which Pentax claims is now the world’s thinnest interchangeable lens.

The K-01 also looks quite different than other cameras in its genre. Having been designed by acclaimed London-based designer, Marc Newson, it features an eye-catching pop of yellow on its bubbly little body. (If the bold yellow is too much for you, the camera also comes in black or white.) Pentax is calling the camera more than a photographer’s tool; it’s also a design object. And while this particular aesthetic might not be my favorite, the design junkie in me can definitely appreciate the collaboration.

But what matters most is the guts of the camera, because it needs to take inspiring photos, not just look interesting hanging from your neck. The K-01 features a 16-megapixel APS-C sized CMOS image sensor, a 3-inch 920K dot LCD display, an ISO range of 100-25600, and shoots full 1080p HD video.

The K-01 will be available in March for $749.95 (body only) or $899.95 (with DA 40mm XS).

(PENTAX)

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Survey Reveals that Digital Camera Use is Down, Mobile Device Capture is Up

Photobucket today released the results of a survey taken over the 2011 holiday season that reveals a downward trend in digital camera capture. “Only 64% reported use of digital cameras for capturing the majority of their images throughout the season, down from 82 percent in the 2010 holiday survey,” Photobucket reports. The trend translates to video capture as well, with 80% reporting they shot video on a mobile device at least once and half of those people saying they used a mobile device to record video daily or multiple times per day during the survey period.

In other words, unsurprisingly, people are becoming more and more dependent on iPhones and the like, rather than dedicated photo gear, to capture daily life. Of course this wasn’t necessarily a survey of photography enthusiasts whose interests lie only in producing the best images, but rather, more likely, it reflects the habits of those concerned with capturing images most conveniently. Clearly, though, any of us could report from anecdotal evidence that among hobbyists and novices alike it is increasingly the custom to make use of both formats, depending on the shooting situation.

What about you? Do you find yourself using a camera phone most often for daily capture, or do you hold fast to the dedicated digital camera for all your shooting?

(Photobucket)

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