How-To

How-To: Photographing Animals

How-To: Photographing Animals at Home and in the Wild
Text and Photos by Lynne Eodice

If you’re like me—a photographer who is also an animal lover—chances are, your furry four-legged friends are among your favorite subjects. But photographing animals, whether it’s your pet dog or a zebra at the zoo, requires patience, good timing and skill. It’s difficult to pose them (in some cases, impossible), and they won’t sit still for long.

The first thing you will want to decide is what you want to portray about the animal you’re photographing. Is it the graceful beauty of a cat, the protective nature of a mother bison with her calf, or the energy of your dog running on the beach? The good news is that you probably won’t have to travel to exotic locales to find good photo opportunities. Animal subjects can be found as close as your own backyard or the local zoo.

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How-To: Options for Close-Up & Macro Shooting

How-To: Options for Close-Up & Macro Shooting
Text and Photos by Lynne Eodice

There is a small, intimate world that most people overlook, but it can be a rewarding experience for the photographer who chooses to explore it with a good close-up or macro lens (like the above photo of lavender). All you need is patience, a good eye, and a special piece of equipment or two.

Options

There are several ways to shoot close-ups with your DSLR: with the close-up setting on your camera, a macro lens, extension tubes or bellows, or a close-up “lens” that attaches to the front of your lens like a filter. Although the close-up lens/filter is the least expensive option, it is inferior optically to a true macro lens or extension tubes or bellows.

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How-To: A Primer on Long Exposures

How-To: A Primer on Long Exposures
Text and Photos by Lynne Eodice

In contrast to using fast shutter speeds to freeze action, using long exposures is a very creative means to convey motion in a photograph. A blurred image can be a very impressionistic rendition of movement, giving the viewer a sense of sensation. This how-to story will cover blurred motion, panning, zooming your lens during an exposure and capturing streaks of light from traffic at night. Experiment with these simple techniques, and have fun getting dramatic images!

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How-To: Shooting in Existing Light

Bellagio_OutdoorNight

How-To: Shooting in Existing Light
Text and Photos by Lynne Eodice

Some of the best photo opportunities present themselves in situations that would appear to pose lighting challenges, such as outdoors at dusk or dawn, or indoors with window light or artificial illumination. This how-to story provides tips on meeting these challenges without using flash.

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How To Retouch Photographs

by Joe Farace

Before you think about retouching any digital image file there are a few simple and basic steps you should consider before you snap the shutter that will minimize the amount of retouching your portraits might need. Good make-up artists are worth whatever they cost and make a big difference in the final portrait. With the right make-up artist and subject you may not need any retouching! Another way to minimize retouching is to slightly overexpose the portrait, making it just a little lighter and brighter than what your meter or camera says is “correct.” This will add a little radiant glow and minimize any minor facial imperfections.

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